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How Intuit Used Design Thinking To Boost Sales By $10M In A Year

Good insights on using Design Thinking to be more innovative.

"To test their idea, the team suggested changes to the script used in the call center. They then ran some quick tests right then, on the fly, with call center staff, customers, and prospects.

In a very short period of time they learned that many more people were interested in buying just one seat, or three seats. As a result, after further testing, they changed their policy to sell individual and smaller numbers of seats. What was the result of this small customer-centric, quick prototype test? A $10 million increase in sales in the first year."

Source: FastCoDesign.com

Why You Need to Wireframe

Good piece from Webflow blog on importance of using a wireframe to build a website. 

Why you need to wireframe

"If a sitemap provides the blueprint for your whole website, a wireframe represents the blueprint for a single page (or group of pages). It’s what you’d see if you could take your sitemap, then zoom in on and enhance a single page in that high-level map. 

Like the sitemap, a wireframe captures hierarchy. But this time, that hierarchy is limited to a single page, and thus defines the relative importance of content as it flows down the page. 

Similar to prototypes, wireframes can come in a variety of levels of fidelity. Some wireframes basically are the final design, complete with the final fonts and sizing, sample photos, and even production-ready copy. Others are much more schematic, sticking with a collection of monochrome boxes and blobs where content will one day appear. 

Because of that wide range of fidelities, it’s important to clearly explain to your stakeholders just how final-final your wireframe is."

Image Source: Derek Clark created this wireframe, which shows only the basic elements of a page layout, but still communicates so much of how the final design will look and function.

599dde98b8464a0001c15498_blue-wireframe-by-derek-clark.jpg